Exams are done and I’m no less busy! Typical!

Exams have been and gone for over two weeks now and yet I feel much more busy and swamped with things to do than during revision time!

Whilst we’re on the subject… exams went fine for the most part as far as I can tell. I felt good about all but one of them and so we’ll have to see how that one goes. I didn’t get a chance to revise that much for it as I focussed a lot of my effort on the other content which was more challenging so if I have to retake it, I have to retake it. I’ll find out soon enough as results are literally a week today! It’s come around so fast, I can’t quite believe it. For those of you interested in the structure of pre-clinical medical school exams – certainly for my medical school anyway – we tend to have 3 each sitting. We normally have a multiple choice paper, a written paper and a practical anatomy spotter paper across two modules covering broad system areas of basic science. It’s alright actually as the exams are done within 3 days though the period of revision leading up to them is not particularly fun. Generally the pass rate is 50% but it is adjusted based on difficulty of the paper. To most people who aren’t yet at medical school that sounds astronomically easy as I’m sure you’re used to getting at least 80% for your A grades but it can be quite difficult to achieve due to the amount of content that theoretically can be covered in each of these exams. Anyway, I’ll let you know how results pan out. If they’re alright I’ll no doubt be bouncing off the ceiling!

Now that exams are over though I’m more stressed than I was before, oh the irony. It’s because I (rather stupidly) have got on board with three different productions of musicals with my students union. One of them finished last week and went so well but I still have rehearsals every evening for the other two. It’s madness! Still it is good fun, I am a little bit concerned about the lack of time that I have to do work however. The module that we’re currently doing is thankfully extremely forgiving (we’re doing a gastrointestinal module which after a nervous system module focussing entirely on the central nervous system is a nice relaxing step down!). We move on in a weeks time though to a module about endocrine and life cycle which is going to be much busier and more conceptually difficult so I will have to keep on top of that.

Other exciting news (sorry this has now totally turned into a mega splurge update post) is that I will be returning to America this summer to work at the summer camp I worked for last year! I’m so excited I can’t even contain myself! For those of you unaware – which is probably everyone as I don’t think I’ve yet mentioned this on this blog – I went to Virginia last year with Camp America to work at a summer camp for adults with disabilities. It was THE most fantastic thing I’ve ever done and a couple of weeks ago I decided, screw it, and have decided to go back despite the costs etc etc. (The picture at the top of this post is a snap from my travels after camp from Santa Monica beach in LA) So immediately after the end of the semester I’ll be flying out to see all the wonderful people I met last year again. I think my medic friends are already getting bored of my over excited anecdotes from last year and the constant updates on the progress of my visa and flight booking escapades but oh well! Life is for living, you have to grab it by the horns and I won’t have a summer long enough to ever do this again so I’m going for it.

Anyhow, I will let you know the outcome of results and if anything else interesting crops up I’ll be sure to write about it.

Speaking of which I have just remembered – I had a bizarre almost out of body experience today in the anatomy lab. I was looking at a dissection in which all of the abdominal fascia and peritoneum around the spleen had been removed, hence the spleen was free enough that you could pick it up still attached by its vessels and hold the whole thing. I picked it up without really thinking and was having a conversation about something completely irrelevant with my friend when it occurred to me how casually I was holding this spleen without finding it at all strange. It’s bizarre because, however horrible, as a medical student you quickly become immune to the anatomy lab and the fact that you are looking at dead people who have kindly donated themselves for your education. There are moments in the lab when you look at the situation as though from outside eyes and realise how weird it is. I had one of those moments today whilst holding that persons spleen and found myself wondering about the person who the spleen belonged to. It’s unfortunately far to easy to forget that once it belonged to a walking, talking complex human being. I was reminded today of the importance to take a minute to be grateful to the people who have agreed to donating their bodies for the education of medical students.

On that reflective note – until next time!

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